Duidao // Tête-bêche

“The first work by Liu Yichang I read was Duidao. The title is a Chinese translation of tête-bêche, which describes stamps that are printed top to bottom facing each other. Duidao centres round the intersection of two parallel stories – of an old man and a young girl. One is about memories, the other anticipation.

To me, tête-bêche is more than a term for stamps or intersection of stories. It can be the intersection of light and colour, silence and tears.

Tête-bêche can also be the intersection of time: for instance, youthful eyes on an aging face, borrowed words on revisited dreams.”  -WKW

 

“We have no idea, now, of who or what the inhabitants of our future might be. In that sense, we have no future.  

We have no future because our present is too volatile. …  The spinning of the given moment’s scenarios.”   -WG

 

 

 

“The future is there, looking back at us. Trying to make sense of the fiction we will have become.

And from where they are, the past behind us will look nothing at all like the past we imagine behind us now.”  -WG

 

 

 

 

“A year here and he still dreamed of cyberspace, hope fading nightly. All the speed he took, all the turns he’d taken and the corners he cut in Night City, and he’d still see the matrix in his dreams, bright lattices of logic unfolding across that colourless void…  

But the dreams came on in the Japanese night like livewire voodoo, and he’d cry for it, cry in his sleep, and wake alone in the dark, curled in his capsule in some coffin hotel, hands clawed into the bedslab, temper foam bunched between his fingers, trying to reach the console that wasn’t there.”  -WG

 

 

 

 

 

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